Smoking Cessation

First Nations and Inuit Component of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

http://healthycanadians.gc.ca/publications/healthy-living-vie-saine/fni-tobacco-strat-2012-2017-pni-strat-tabagisme/index-eng.php

Smoking prevalence for Aboriginal Canadians is almost triple that of non-Aboriginal Canadians. According to the 2008/10 Regional Health Survey (RHS), 57% of First Nations adults living on-reserve and in northern First Nations communities smoke daily or occasionally. The 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey reports that 63.3% of Inuit adults are daily or occasional smokers.

Health Canada is concerned about the high rates of smoking within Aboriginal communities.  It is working with First Nations and Inuit partners to take steps to reduce smoking and increase smoke-free environments to support healthy First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities.

The current Federal Tobacco Control Strategy includes $22 million (2012-2017) for a First Nations and Inuit Component.  This component supports First Nations and Inuit communities in implementing evidence-based tobacco control strategies.

NADA coordinates a Community of Practice for the Project Coordinators of the FNI-FTCS.

NADA’s primary goal was to assist the FNI-FTCS recipients and their respective communities to achieve project objectives focused on four (4) key indicators and enhance co-learning and knowledge exchange.

The approach to comprehensive tobacco control is organized around four key intervention pillars of; leadership, health promotion, smoking cessation, and research and evaluation.  Accordingly, the FNI-FTCS has adopted four related key success indicators, as follows:

  1. An increase in the percentage of smoke-free spaces in their communities
  2. An increase in the number and type of smoking-related resolutions and policies that are in place
  3. A decrease in the percentage of daily smokers in comparison to initial baselines
  4. The development of promising practices, both new and existing, that can be shared with other communities

The major objectives of the FNI-FTCS Community of Practice conference were to provide a host site that would augment learning and knowledge exchange opportunities.  Plus, participants were encouraged to share relevant resources, promising practices/strategies around a continuum of tobacco control and prevention modules.

Reports

FTCS-Final-Report 2014-2015

FNI-FTCS Two Year Review 2014-2016

A Report On The Findings From The Annual Outcome Reporting Process (2016-2017)

A Three-Year Report On The Findings From The Annual Outcome Reporting Process (2014-17)

FNI-FTCS Community of Practice Face to Face Gathering 2017 Report

2017 FNI-FTCS Community of Practice: Respecting Tobacco – A Discussion Paper to Inform Future Federal Tobacco Control in Canada

Projects

Nunavut

British Columbia

Alberta

Saskatchewan

Manitoba

Ontario

Quebec

Atlantic Region

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